Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Ask the MK... Tuesday Edition



It's Day Two!!!

For
MK Spirit Week,
we here at the BMW Blog have decided to ask MKs some questions. And the fun part? They may also be rewarded for taking the time to share their answers!

Two randomly selected MKs who respond receive a $10 Amazon electronic gift card.


So here's today's question:

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Are you learning a new language?
Do you ever have to translate for your parents?
Which language do you dream in?
What's your favorite word or phrase in your second language?

If you don't have to learn a new language, which language would you love to learn?

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Please leave your answer in a comment below, and include your name, age, and country or region of service.

Sponsors for today's gift cards:

New Life Baptist Church

Independent Baptist Church Kids
(Thank you for loving on our MKs!)

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To be eligible to win the gift card, we must be able to verify you are in fact a bona fide, true, honest, for real Baptist Missionary Woman's missionary kid, currently living with your parents either on the field, on deputation, or on a temporary furlough.

The deadline to respond is Saturday, March 12th.

The winners will be announced March 14th right here on the blog.

73 comments:

Charity said...

Michaela W., 12 yo, Southern Asia

We are learning Nepali. It can be very hard sometimes. Yes I have often had to translate for my mom during Sunday school. I have dreamed in Nepali before. My favorite phrase is Paakaa Hola... it means "for sure maybe."

Charity said...

Gabriel W. 9 yo, Southern Asia

I am speaking well. No writing and very little reading. I have never dreamed in Nepali. My favorite phrase is danyabaad which is "thank you." When you say that, they laugh.

Charity said...

Ben W., 16, Southern Asia

तिमीलै के छ ? That means 'what's up?' in Nepali. The English pronunciation is, 'Timilai ke chha' and yes, I have to learn that language.
In Nepali, there are many different letters for one English letter, and all of them sound the same! Their is very slight differences in how to say them, but to untrained ears (like anybody who isn't from our field), it is impossible to hear it.
I've never dreamed in Nepali, but I did speak it in one dream I had. I was dreaming that I was in here, though, so it still makes sense. Sometimes I do have to translate for my parents, because although they're also learning it, they don't always understand it.
My favorite phrase in Nepali is, 'Hijo tyo, aaja chhaina." In English, it means, 'Yesterday it was, today its gone.' Meaning... Yesterday, we had a cool toy, now its broken.

Anonymous said...

Rebekah Phillips 14, Central Asia

I am learning Russian. Sometimes I do dream in Russian, but mostly English. I have had to correct my parents gender use. One of my favorite phrases is что ты делаешь? What are you doing?! My favorite word is малина which is raspberries.

Anonymous said...

Cameron Faafouina 8, Samoa

I am trying to learn Samoan, but I speak almost always in English. My favorite word in Samoan is "sukalaki" which means chocolate. I really want to learn to speak Chinese.

Gideon Minks said...

Gideon Minks 12, Hokkaido, Japan

Yes, I am learning Japanese. No, I don't have to translate for my parents (usually I am the one needing a translation ;P ). I don't dream in Japanese very often. 友だち tomodachi (Friend) is my favorite word in Japanese.

Rachel said...

Caleb Winkler 9, Estonia (working with Russian speaking people
)
Yes, I am learning Russian.
No, I do not translate for my parents.
I never dream in Russian.
My favorite word in Russian is собака which means dog.

Anonymous said...

Micah Guay; Tak, Thailand 14
Since I have lived
in Thailand my entire life I learned Thai the natural way like how we learn English. I have had to translate for my parents some bit mostly words that kids use and adults don't. I normally dream in a mix of Thai and English. My favorite word in Thai is ขนม witch means dessert/snack.

Abigail said...

Abigail Petersen 14 yr. Uganda, East Africa
Luganda (our language here) is a tribal language. Tribal language = very difficult! I definitely want to learn it, but it's difficult without a teacher. We have some books, so I am trying to work through those little by little. Sometimes when I am able to pick up on a little bit of a conversation, I get excited and tell my parents what I thought was said, but I don't remember ever having to translate something for my parents. I would definitely be the one needing translation! Also, because the main trade language is English, it isn't really a necessity for me to learn the language. The hard thing is when people tease you for not knowing it or ask when you are going to learn. I don't remember specifically ever dreaming in Luganda unless maybe a national was talking to me in the dream. One word I really love is "Enkoko." I love it because it's really fun to say. It means "chicken." The language I would like to learn would definitely be Luganda. I hope slowly by slowly I will get it, or maybe I can find a teacher.

Susan Abbett said...

Juliana, 15, in France:

Yes, I learned French when I was very little.

Yes, I have to translate sometimes, for my mom, usually.

I usually dream in English, but sometimes in French when I spend a lot of time talking in French (and sometimes I talk in my sleep in French, or English, or Spanish.)

My favorite word or phrase is "Mille million de mille sabords!" which is what Captain Haddock says all the time in the comic books Tintin. (in English, they translate it as "Blue blistering blue barnicles!"

Daniel said...

Daniel, 16, Uganda, East Africa

I have learned some Luganda, but I have not had to learn much, because most of the people here speak English.

I have never had to translate for my parents. I dream in English. My favorite word in Luganda is emmere, which means food.

Elisabeth Guay said...

I am Elisabeth Guay, I am 20, and I live in Thailand. When I first came to Thailand 15 years ago, I had to learn Thai. I was almost five, so I was able to learn Thai by just hearing it spoken around me. I don't remember learning Thai since I was so young; however, I have definitely been actively improving my Thai over the years. I learned how to read and write Thai when I was 9, and I have been working on becoming better at spelling in Thai. I have had to translate for my parents when they didn't know certain words and when they have gotten lost in a conversation. I dream in English and Thai both. Usually the two languages are mixed together in my dreams! And I often find myself thinking in Thai, especially if I am recalling a phone number. There are so many Thai words that I couldn't live without, so it's hard to pick a favorite. I really like the word สบาย (sabai). It would be impossible to translate sabai to just one English word. Some of it's meanings are comfortable, well, and easygoing. If I were to work on learning another language, it would be Chinese. I have always wanted to know Chinese, and I have been able to take a beginner Chinese class. In addition, I am interested in learning Tagalog because I have Filipino friends who come to church here. It would also be nice to learn Karen because lots of the children who come to church are from the Karen hill tribe, and their parents don't know much Thai.

Dawn Spillman said...

Nathaniel's answer to if he is learning a new language was I have been learning Russian all my life so I am still perfecting it.

Daniel's answer was I am still learning Russian but I want to learn another language.

Nathaniel's answer for if he translates for his parents was sometimes for mom but less often.

Daniel's answer was no but it would be fun.

Both said that they dream in English

Nathaniel's favorite word in Russian is zhal жаль wish means to bad.

Daniel's favorite phrase is I want ice cream. Я хочу мороженое.
Daniel also said that he would like to learn Greek, Latin, and Spanish.

Sarah LeClercq said...

Hafa Adai!!! That is hello in Chamorro, the native language on Guam. English is the main language on the island, however most of the older people still know Chamorro. We are learning different phrases to show respect to the elderly. My dad is real good at saying the phrases, I am not too bad, my mom is the worst. (She said I could say that)
Nate, Guam

Sarah LeClercq said...

On Guam English is the main language. I do know some Chamorro, I know how to say John 3:16 in the native language. If I could dream in any language it would be Chinese.

Ethaen,10

Sarah LeClercq said...

I am thankful that we speak English on Guam. If I could speak any language on earth I would want to speak French.

Kathrynn, Guam (7)

Elijah Guay said...

Elijah Guay, 18, Thailand

Yes, I have learned Thai. Since we came to Thailand when I was two, I don't remember initially learning Thai, but I do remember learning how to read Thai and continuing to improve my Thai. Though I have never translated for my parents, I do translate our Sunday Morning Service to English for our Filipino members. เว่อร์ (wu) is my favorite Thai word. It surprisingly comes from the English word over, since Thai people think the ver in over sounds like wu. It means overly exaggerated.

Malachi Minks said...

Are you learning a new language?
I have been working on my Japanese. I can speak some but still learning more!
Do you ever have to translate for your parents?
Usually no. Sometimes if they can't think of a word I will remember it, but most the time I'm the one not sure what word to use ;P
Which language do you dream in?
Usually in English. But at times I am speaking in Japanese (although it is usually never correct :D)
What's your favorite word or phrase in your second language?
すげ! Su ge! Which means COOL! or AWESOME!

Victoria Minks said...

Victoria Minks, 18 years old, Hokkaido Japan

I speak Japanese. :) I do dream in it off and on, and when I was little I used to sleep-talk once in a while in Japanese. But I've grown out of that (as far as I'm aware) and so now it's just dreams in Japanese.
We all help each other out in our family. ;) Sometimes I catch things my parents didn't, and am able to explain to them again in English or a differently constructed Japanese sentence. Other times I get a little lost in the conversation (especially when my mind wanders, lol!) and they understand what was said. When it comes to medical terms my mum is way better than me! But sometimes when talking with a random person out-and-about, or with a friend, my mum won't catch everything. My parents learned the formal, polite way of speech first, and I've picked up a great deal of the language from neighbor kids and just talking. So we all balance each other out. :P
I have quite a few favorite words in Japanese, but my favorite ones tend to be hard to translate into English. がんばって Ganbatte is like "keep at it!/good luck!/you can do it!/etc" and 木漏れ日 Komorebi is the word they use for the way that sunlight looks when it is filtering through tree leaves.
It's been really great hearing other Mk's answers! I love words and languages so it's been fun reading. ;)

anativetexan said...

I learned Spanish when we moved to the Dominican Republic 8 years ago. Yes, I do translate for my parents sometimes. I dream mostly in English but sometimes in Spanish (depends on who I am with in my dream). My favorite phrase in Spanish is "Quiero Chocolate", which means, "I want chocolate".
Julianna Schepers, 16, Dominican Republic

Heather ♥ {Missionary Mama} said...

Clara, 8, Argentina

I have been here since I was 20 months old so I have been learning Spanish since then.
When I was 2 my parents asked me what the word for "bib" was in Spanish and I simply answered "babero".
I dream in English.
My favorite word is "chau". It means goodbye. I like it because my grandpa says it is like dog chow.

Duane and Shellee said...

From Josiah W. Age 15, Japan
Yes, I am learning Japanese.
No, I do not usually translate for my parents.
I sometimes dream in Japanese.
My favorite phrase or word in Japanese is, Yappari which means "Go figure"

Unknown said...

Micah Doan, 14, Lithuania

I am trying to to learn Lithuanian but struggling to learn.
I don't have to translate for my parents they know a lot more than me.
I dream in English.
My favorite phrase in Lithuanian is {Ka tu darai} which means [what are you doing].
I would like to learn Chinese for a new language.

Heather ♥ {Missionary Mama} said...

Brenna, 3, Argentina

When I asked her, in English, if she is learning a new language she said, "SIII!!" HA
My mom and dad help me understand sometimes.
English
My favorite word is "buho", that's "owl". I like them.

Heather ♥ {Missionary Mama} said...

Ethan, 6, Argentina

No, I already learned 2 languages, English and Spanish.
No, they already know those 2 languages.
English
I like "rana" because it means "frog" and I like "tiburón" because that is a shark.

Philip Tharp said...

Darren Tharp - Age 10 - Ireland
I don't have to learn a new language in Ireland but I think I would like to learn how to speak Spanish. Because there are a lot of people who speak it and it would be useful to learn.

Philip Tharp said...

Katie Tharp - Age 8 - Ireland
I don't have to learn a new language either but I would love to learn French. Because my Mommy knows a little of that language and France is the country of love!

David and Dee Dee Sterling said...

Ryan Sterling, 14, Russia

Are you learning a new language? Yes. Russian
Do you ever have to translate for your parents? No.
Which language do you dream in? I dream in English but, one time I had a dream in Russian.
What's your favorite word or phrase in your second language? "индоутки" which is the word for Muscovy ducks that we had here as pets. It was funny for me to say.

Unknown said...

No.1 No, but i would love to learn Russian or French. :)
No.2 No
No.3 English
No.4 Noriu saldainiai (I want candy) :)

Esther, age 12, Lithuania

Kristen said...

Andrew Age 6 Puerto Rico

1. Yes. Spanishh.
2. No, I dont know enough spanish yet.
3. English
4. Gracias

Kristen said...

Sara age 4 Puerto Rico

1. Yes. Spanish
2. No
3. English
4. None! LOL

Kristen said...

Zachary age 5

1. Yes Spanish
2. No
3. English
4. Tres (three)

Sally Stensaas said...

Stensaas Family: In Uganda, English is the official language, although there are over 40 tribal languages. Hence, the kids know just a few words in the local tribal language, although they know many songs. They dream in English.

Shae-Lynn Stensaas - I like to say "tula wansi" meaning "sit down." I think it would be fun to learn Gaelic with my brother.
Shiloh Stensaas - I think I would like to learn Romanian.
Skyler Stensaas - I would like to learn Spanish.
Savannah Stensaas - I would like to learn French.

Chris and Carole said...

Jonathan Shull (8) Greenland
We have two languages. Greenlandic and Danish.
I dream in English.
My favorite word in Greenlandic is Qujan it means Thank You.
I want to learn Spanish.

Chris and Carole said...

Anna Grace Shull (13) Greenland

No, I don’t have to translate for my parents. My Dad is usually translating Greenlandic for us when we need him to!
I am learning two languages. Greenlandic and Danish. Greenlandic is very hard so I mostly speak Danish.
I sometimes dream in Danish.
My favorite phrase is "Iipilimik perusuppunga". I like how it sounds when you say it. It means “I would like one apple”
I am learning sign language and I want to learn french. I have a French Canadian uncle and it would be fun to speak french with him.

Chris and Carole said...

Christopher Shull (14) Greenland

In Greenland they speak two languages. Greenlandic and Danish. They are nothing alike. Greenlandic is very, very difficult, so I speak in Danish most of the time, while still studying Greenlandic.
When we first moved here and I went to first grade I would translate for my Mom when she was talking to the teacher, but I haven’t had to do that in a long time.
I dream in English when I dream. I don’t really dream that much.
I like "Tusind Tak" it literally means “A thousand thanks”
I am learning Morse Code and would like to learn french eventually.

Chris and Carole said...

Emilia Faith Shull (10) Greenland

Yes, I am learning Greenlandic and Danish.
No, I don’t have to translate for my parents.
I dream in English.
"Guutip pilluaqqulisit" it means "God bless you”.
I am learning Sign Language and would like to learn Spanish. I would also like to learn Icelandic because I was born in Iceland.

Becca S said...

Andrew, 15, Cameroon, West Africa

"I am not learning a new language, currently. I will be taking French in school soon. The language that is mostly spoken in Bambili is Pidgin. My favorite phrase in pidgin is "Ashya for Poto Poto," which means, "I'm sorry for the mud." If I had to choose one language to learn it would be French.

Chris and Carole said...


Mattaliina Joy (4) Greenland

Yes
No
I think Danish but I don’t know.
"Mamakujuit" it means "Candy"
I can say “popcorn” in sign language.

Jackie's Journal said...

Naomi Siekbert•17•Ghana,Africa
The language I am learning is sign language, and I do know a little Fante (the Ghanaian language) but not much since their official language is English. I do have to translate for my parents sometimes lol! My favorite word to sign is "friend" and my favorite word in Fante is "oyeafie" which means beautiful. The only language I've dreamed in is English. If I could learn a different language it would be German.

Susan Abbett said...

Timothy, age 12 in France:

I don't have to learn a new language because I grew up speaking English and French.

I don't translate.

I dream in English.

My favorite word is "courir" which means "run."

Rachel said...

Sarah Winkler, 13 - Estonia (reaching the Russian speaking people)

I am currently studying Russian.
No, I do not ever translate for my parents.
I do not usually dream in Russian, but I have once or twice.
My favorite word in Russian is конечно which means "of course".

Rachel said...

Andrew Winkler, 15 - Estonia (working with Russian speaking people)

Yes, I am studying Russian.
No, I don't translate for my parents.
No, I do not dream in Russian.
My favorite word is хорошо which means "good".

Rachel said...

Daniel Winkler, 16 - Estonia (working with Russian speaking people)

Yes, I am learning Russian.
No, I do not translate for my parents.
No, I do not dream in Russian.
My favorite word is бежать which means "to run".

Lisa M said...

Levi McCoy, Alaska

I do not have to learn a new language. My favorite word in Eskimo is "Eshagee" which means "scary".

The Boylston Family said...

Khloe Boylston (9) Pohnpei

We are learning Pohnpeian, but don't know very much of it. We live in town where most people know at least a little English. I do not translate for my parents. I do not dream in Pohnpeian. I like the word "rahr". It rhymes with "car", but it reminds me of the word "roar" and means "coral".

The Boylston Family said...

Kierra Boylston (12) Pohnpei
Yes, I'm learning Pohnpeian. I don't know it very well, but I have told my dad a couple of words. I've never dreamed in Pohnpeian. My favorite phrase is "I sto wewehki." The "t" makes a "tch" sound and the "h" makes the vowel held out longer. I like it because I think it sounds nice. It means "I don't understand", so I use it a lot. I am also learning sign language and I really enjoy that.

The Boylston Family said...

Kody Boylston (17) Pohnpei, FSM
We are trying to learn Pohnpeian.
I have never translated for my parents.
I have never dreamed in Pohnpeian, but I have dreamed about not being able to remember a Pohnpeian word. One word that have always been able to remember is "singising". When I first learned it, having an English mindset, it sounded like the word "sing" being repeated. The word actually means passing gas.
Another language I would want to learn is Kosraen since Kosrae is another one of the states of the FSM (Federated States of Micronesia).

The Boylston Family said...

Kaleb Boylston (15) Pohnpei, FSM
I'm trying to learn Pohnpeian, but there aren't really any teachers available and the lady that was tutoring us got a job and doesn't have time now. I learn some words and phrases from my friends.
I have never translated for my parents, but my mom helps translate for me.
I have never dreamed in Pohnpeian, but I have dreamed that I was asking people to tell me how to say something in Pohnpeian, but no one could tell me.

The Boylston Family said...

Kyle Boylston (18) Pohnpei, FSM
We are picking up a little of the Pohnpeian language "ekis ekis" (little by little).
I have never translated for my parents.
I have never dreamed in Pohnpeian.
I like the word "manaman" which means "power" or "strength". When I first learned it, I remembered it by seeing (man)a(man). Another interesting word is "salenge eni". It is used to mean "mushroom", but its literal meaning is "ear of monster".
I am also trying to learn Japanese online and would like to learn more just for fun. I just enjoy the way it sounds. It is interesting that several Pohnpeian words are actually variations of the Japanese words for the same thing.

The Peart Family said...

Madelyn Peart, 15, Haiti
I speak Haitian Creole, but now that we have started a deaf ministry, I have to learn sign laguage too. We even sing in French sometimes as well. I don't have to translate for my parents, but I do translate for other visitors when they come. I also get to teach the Kid's Bible Club.

Penny said...

I live in Estonia, but we minister mostly to Russian speaking people. I am trying to learn Russian. I have never interpreted for my parents, and I only dream in English. I don't have a favorite word yet. Luke Smith-Estonia

Dalene Clark said...

Kortney (7) Germany
Yes, I'm learning German. I dream in English. I like saying, "Was ist deine Name?" (what's your name)

Dalene Clark said...

Kameron (11) Germany
Yes, I'm learning German. I dream in English. I like the word Natuerlich - just means naturally.

Dalene Clark said...

Kyndall (15) Germany
Yes, I'm improving my German. I usually dream in English, but I have dreamt in German. My favorite words are Naturwissenschaft (Science) and Krankenwagon (ambulance).

Stephen Benefield said...

Stephen Benefield, 10, Cambodia

I dream in English. I don't speak much Khmer, so I don't translate for my parents. Some of my favorite Khmer words are not really words, but are sound effects that Khmer people use when telling a story. Some of their noises sound so funny, like instead of saying beep beep or honk honk for a horn, they say ape ape. I would like to learn Russian.

Candace Benefield said...

Candace, 16, Cambodia
I dream in English except for one time one person in my dream was speaking Khmer. I never have to translate for my dad and only every once in a while for my mom. One of my favorite words is "toh" which means "let's go." I would like to learn American sign language.

Stephen Benefield said...

Seth Benefield, 6, Cambodia

I don't know much Khmer. I like the word for Bible, which sounds like preah kompee. Someday I would like to learn French so I can talk to my friend in French. He speaks English, French, and Khmer.

Deborah Benefield said...

Deborah Benefield, 15, Cambodia

I speak Khmer and have had a couple of dreams in Khmer. Three words that I like are "yap" (frustrating), "rapuh" (hyperactive; rowdy), and "chong-ee-it" (narrow, crowded). I like these words because they are so descriptive. I also like the phrase "see moung" which literally means "eating hours" and is used when someone is taking too long to do something.

I recently learned Cambodian Sign Language, and someday would like to learn American Sign Language and also Spanish.

Emma Benefield said...

Emerald Grace Benefield, 13, Cambodia

I speak Khmer. Occasionally I have to help my mom with a word. I don't think I've ever dreamed in Khmer. One phrase that cracks me up is "ngoap howey" (literally, "died already"). It is an expression of frustration kind of like "oh man!" or "good grief!"

Jamie Knickerbocker said...

Paul, SE Asia
Are you learning a new language? Nepali
Do you ever have to translate for your parents? No
Which language do you dream in? American
What's your favorite word or phrase in your second language? My name is Fall in Nepali.

If you don't have to learn a new language, which language would you like to learn? Antartican

Jamie Knickerbocker said...

Paul, SE Asia
Are you learning a new language? NEpali
Do you ever have to translate for your parents? No
Which language do you dream in? American
What's your favorite word or phrase in your second language? My name in Nepali is Fall.

If you don't have to learn a new language, which language would you love to learn? Antartican

Jamie Knickerbocker said...

Jason SE, Asia
Are you learning a new language? NEpali
Do you ever have to translate for your parents? No
Which language do you dream in? English
What's your favorite word or phrase in your second language? Dhanyabad--it means thank you

If you don't have to learn a new language, which language would you love to learn? Eurasian--haha

Jamie Knickerbocker said...

Abby SE, Asia
Are you learning a new language? Nepali
Do you ever have to translate for your parents? No
Which language do you dream in? English
What's your favorite word or phrase in your second language? Yeshu--means Jesus

If you don't have to learn a new language, which language would you love to learn? Chinese

Abigail Minks said...

I am learning Japanese. I suppose you could say I've translated for my parents. We all help each other out with the language. ;)
I usually dream in English, but I have dreamt in Japanese and in English with a Japanese accent. :)
My favorite word in Japanese is 便利 (benri) which means handy, convenient, or useful.  

Duane and Shellee said...

Titus W. Age 11, Japan-
Yes, I am learning Japanese.
No I do not translate for my parents or dream in Japanese.
My favorite word in Japanese is 愛 (ai) which means love.

Anonymous said...


In NZ we will not have to learn a new language just learn different ways to say words and phrases. These are the boys favorite words.

Isaac - 9

Rubbish - trash

Ethan - 8

gridiron - American Football

Landon - 7

gridiron - American Football

The Guenthers Missionary New Zealand

Anonymous said...

Madisyn Lien, 15, Indonesia
Yes, I am learning Indonesian. It is surprisingly easy since we use the same alphabet as English. I do have to translate for my mom occasionally. I've spoken Indonesian in dreams, but I've never had a dream fully in Indonesian. One of my favorite words is "kismis" which means raisin (even though I don't like raisins) and my favorite phrase is "kasihan, dong" which (roughly) means "too bad, dude."

Angela said...

Alyssa Pratt (16) India
Yes, I am learning Arabic in school.I would like to learn Gaelic, because my sister and I LOOOVVVEEE Ireland!! I already know Hindi and am conversant in Punjabi. I dream in English and Hindi. On many occasions I translate for my parents. My favorite word or phrase is: Ghumne chale? This means: Let's go somewhere!

Ethan Pratt (11) India
I am learning Punjabi. I already know Hindi and English. I dream in Hindi and English or both at the same time. I haven't translated for my parents. My favorite word is: thakke dehi This means like: "What even!"

Melody Pratt (13) India
I am learning Punjabi. I already know Hindi. I dream in Hindi and English. I haven't translated for my parents. My favorite word is pagal which means crazy!

Kara Pratt (6) India
I know Hindi and English. I dream in English. I don't translate. My favorite word is: Kya yaar This means: Come on, man

Naomi Pratt (15) India
I am not learning a new language now, but I'm the sister who looovveess Ireland too. I know Hindi, Punjabi, and English. I would like to learn Arabic. I dream in Hindi and English. I have translated a lot in the past few years. My favorite word or phrase is: Kaha ki baat kr rhe hai? This means: What are you talking about?

Becca S said...

Emma Sinclair, 11, Cameroon, Africa
"Yes, when people talk pidgin here in Cameroon I learn a little bit each time. No, I don't translate for my parents. I dream in English. My favorite word in Pidgin is "Ashya" which means "Hello" or "I'm sorry."

Becca S said...

Faith Ann Sinclair, 9, Cameroon, Africa
No, I'm not learning a new language. I don't translate for my parents. I would love to learn the language of the country Georgia.

Becca S said...

Kate Sinclair, 13, Cameroon, Africa
I learn pidgin English sometimes. I don't translate for my parents. I dream in English. My favorite pidgin word is "chop" which means to eat. I would love to learn to speak Spanish.

Charity said...

Submissions are now closed.